Sleeping with SI Joint Pain



People who are suffering from sacroiliac joint pain find it very difficult to lie in bed since they cannot position themselves on the sore side; and neither can they lay on their back nor on their stomach because getting up from these positions can send sharp pain to the sore hip. Lying on the uninjured side for a long time could also be uncomfortable. And so, experts in the field recommend some helpful tips to make SI joint sufferers sleep better.

How To Sleep Better With Sacroiliac Joint Pain

Softer mattress. Improper lying position for a healthy person can result to a painful body; so much more for those who are affected with sacroiliac joint pain. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is worsened by improper spine alignment and poor support in the lower back.  Therefore, for a comfortable sleep, it is wise to choose a slightly softer mattress that would provide support to your spine, and make you comfortable as you lie down.

Neck pillows. Also called cervical pillows or orthopedic pillows, neck pillows have a deeper depression in the center where the neck can rest. This will allow your head to rest back even as the foam holds the cervical region of your spine. People suffering from neck pain can benefit this type of pillow as it keeps the neck aligned with the spine.

Knee pillows. When sleeping on one’s side, it is important to bend the knees and place a firm pillow between them to keep the spine in neutral position and set the knees apart. This will keep the upper leg from rotating downwards over the lower leg, protect the pelvis, and maintain the natural line of the spine. Hence, it helps the back to heal and properly rested while sleeping.

Placing a pillow under the back of the knees while sleeping on one’s back contributes to the reduction of pressure on the lower back.  It is even better to pile two pillows under the knees to elevate the knees higher and flatten the lumbar spine so that the pain sensitive joints of the spine may be reduced.


Body pillows.  A body pillow is advisable for those who prefer to sleep on their side as it supports the head, neck, knees, and legs. It also provides added abdominal support for pregnant women.

Avoid staying in bed for too long. Staying in bed for too long will only put a lot of strain on the lower back muscles. Thus, even as you try to get enough sleep, avoid going beyond the eight-hour-per-day mark.

Use the Logroll Technique. This is done by rolling to one side where you plan to get out of. Then, bring your knees together toward your chest, but keep your legs close to the bed all the time.  Next, use your hands and arms to push your body up as you bring your legs slowly down.  As you do this, most of your body weight is now on your hip, buttocks, and thighs. Then, place your hands on your thighs and extend your back up even as you push yourself up to a standing position. Do not be in a rush in doing this simple manoeuvre, remembering that your back, at this point, is still waking up.  You may also use the reverse of this technique in going back to bed.

Do not stress yourself out. Stress can push your muscles to grow tense and consequently contribute to back pain.

Sacral belt. This is a thin belt that is worn around the pelvis to stabilize it while you sleep.